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4 Touchpoints for Nonprofits During Covid-19

4 Touchpoints for Nonprofits During Covid-19

There’s no doubt about it — Covid-19 has created challenges for all of us.

While it is too early to know exactly what the future holds, it will be necessary for leaders in the non-profit world to be savvy about a wide range of topics — and to be nimble in their approach to fundraising. Here are 4 ideas your organization can utilize now to move forward.


Go Digital
Make certain you provide your supporters with “digital ways” to give. Does your current website/Facebook presence make it easy for donors to make a contribution, register for an event, or send feedback to your newsletter. Churches may not be the only organizations who won’t be able to ‘pass the plate” in traditional ways!

Connect
Increase telephone calls to your donors and connect regularly. Ask them for their opinions, see how they are doing personally, and most of all, make sure they know they are important to your organization. Even if they choose not to donate now, when the time is right for them, they will continue to support you!

Tell Your Story 
Use technology to “tell your story” every chance you get. Older donors are becoming more “tech savvy” as the result of Covid-19. Younger donors crave social media and online connections. If you haven’t already, now may be the time to invest in virtual platforms to communicate and express your gratitude.

Connect Again
And while virtual events and activities seem to be the way of the future, don’t forget to also connect in more traditional ways. Send personally signed or handwritten letters to your donors and supporters detailing how their gifts impact the world. Tell them about the people who benefit and maybe even include pictures if appropriate. Donors are part of your organization’s family and family is important. Treat them like your favorite Aunt Sally!

With or without Covid-19, the future will call for creative strategies, new technologies, and an organizational willingness to embrace uncertainty and new thinking.